Sordid Cinema Podcast
Sordid Cinema Podcast #558: ‘Frailty’ Remains a Solid Horror Mystery

Sordid Cinema Podcast #558: ‘Frailty’ Remains a Solid Horror Mystery

October 26, 2020

Frailty Podcast Review

The late Bill Paxton’s 2001 directorial debut Frailty may have passed by unnoticed at the box office, but over time this low-budget, atmospheric horror film has maintained a steady appreciation. This week Rick and Patrick are joined by Montreal-based film writer and professor Matthew Hays to break down just what makes this underseen gem so good, as well as dive into its themes of religious piety and family dynamics. The story of a man who believes he has been chosen by God to destroy demons living as humans on earth delves into dark places, as this good-natured mechanic also turns his mission into a family affair – even as one of his sons thinks his father may be going insane.

From strong performances to an interesting script with an unreliable narrator, Frailty consistently engages the audience and is sure to surprise them as well with its many (too many?) twists. Join us as we sort out all the plot details and ponder the mysteries. How well does Frailty handle the supernatural elements? Would the film have worked even better with more ambiguity, or is the clarity of vision one of its strengths? For all this and more, have a listen!

Sordid Cinema Podcast #447: An Invitation To The Dance: ‘The Exorcist III’ at 30

Sordid Cinema Podcast #447: An Invitation To The Dance: ‘The Exorcist III’ at 30

October 19, 2020

William Peter Blatty, author of The Exorcist, wrote and directed this creepy thriller, based on his novel Legion. Thankfully he ignored the events of John Boorman’s disappointing Exorcist II: The Heretic, and abandoned cheap scares altogether, instead allowing the events to unfold like a detective story about one man’s search for faith. The Exorcist 3 isn’t quite as good as the first film, but thanks to some powerful performances by Brad Dourif and George C. Scott, Blatty directs a picture that is just as frightening.

There are several stand-out scenes: The dream sequence with George C. Scott moving through Heaven, delivers a strong punch, and the moment where George C. Scott enters the ward and the camera pans upwards to reveal one of the patients crawling on the ceiling, is spooky as hell. However, the most memorable scene comes when a nurse investigates strange noises during her graveyard shift. Director Blatty shows great patience in holding a far shot for an ample amount of time while making good use of ominous sounds heard in the distance. The sequence culminates with not one, but two of the best jump scares you’ll ever see; both will have you jolt from your seat. On the climactic exorcism scene, Blatty fought with the producers who demanded a frenzy of special effects. In retrospect, this might be one of the rare times in which the studio made the right choice and not the director. After all, what is an Exorcist film without an exorcism?

The picture is also extraordinarily well-acted by the likes of George C. Scott, who provides some of his best work, and Brad Dourif (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest), who is equally riveting as The Gemini Killer. Gerry Fisher’s widescreen lensing is put to excellent use within the narrow corridors and caged cells of the asylum and Barry De Vorzon’s eerie score will make the hairs on your arms stand up. Those looking for a truly creepy picture, look no further. On this episode of the Sordid Cinema Podcast, we’ll go over all this and explain why The Exorcist 3 will surely get under your skin.

Sordid Cinema Podcast #554: ‘Dressed to Kill’ is Draped in Stylish De Palma

Sordid Cinema Podcast #554: ‘Dressed to Kill’ is Draped in Stylish De Palma

July 29, 2020

Dressed to Kill Podcast Review

Though many may not rank it among his best (including our own Ricky D), Brian De Palma’s Dressed to Kill is nevertheless a perfect example of how a particular director can greatly enhance the material through individual craftsmanship and sensibilities. Sure, what should be a fairly simple story of a high-class call girl both investigating and fleeing from the mysterious woman she witnessed commit a bloody murder might get a bit needlessly convoluted and confusing thanks to De Palma’s screenplay, but there is never any doubt in the clarity of the visuals. The director brings his Hitchcockian best here, with several standout scenes worthy of discussion, including a virtuoso flirtation sequence in a museum, as well as a grisly slashing in an elevator.

 

In addition to the fantastic camerawork, Rick and Patrick also save some praise for the performances, many of which rise above the sometimes-hokey dialogue to create memorable characters (and yes, that praise includes Nancy Allen as call girl Liz). They also discuss De Palma’s influences, and though Dressed to Kill might seem like an overt homage to Hitchcock’s Psycho, it also owes something to giallo horror films of the day. These elements all come together to result in a stylish, adult thriller the likes of which modern audiences could use more of. But can Dressed to Kill still enjoy a wide appeal?

 

For all this and more, have a listen!

 

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #553: The True Villain of “Candyman” Isn’t the Hook-Handed Ghost

Sordid Cinema Podcast #553: The True Villain of “Candyman” Isn’t the Hook-Handed Ghost

July 9, 2020

Candyman Podcast Review

This week the Sordid Cinema Podcast takes a look at Bernard Rose’s Candyman – a radical, sophisticated psychological horror film that is just as effective, relevant, and terrifying today as it was upon its release. Joining us is Sean Colletti (co-host of the Mid-Season Replacements Podcast) to discuss Tony Todd’s iconic performance; Philip Glass’s operatic score; Bernard Rose’s Hitchcockian direction, and Virginia Madsen’s powerhouse performance as the so-called hero (but possibly villain), Helen. All this and more!

Sordid Cinema Podcast #552: Revisiting’Gremlins 2: The New Batch’

Sordid Cinema Podcast #552: Revisiting’Gremlins 2: The New Batch’

July 2, 2020

One of the Best Horror Sequels Turns 30!

Gremlins 2: The New Batch Podcast Review

This week the Sordid Cinema Podcast takes a look at 1990’s Gremlins 2: The New Batch, one of the strangest sequels ever made by a Hollywood studio. Famous for director Joe Dante’s reluctance to return to his world of the mischievous little monsters without the total creative control eventually granted him, Gremlins 2 plays almost like a satire of the original, as well as of sequels in general and numerous cultural trends at the time. Chaotic, comedic, yet tightly structured, this renegade, Looney Tunes-inspired film mocks everything from the convoluted Mogwai Rules to the sad backstories that Kate seems to have for specific holidays. And thanks to Rick Baker (also a co-producer), there are plenty of amazing creatures perpetrating the hijinks this time around. Bat gremlins, spider gremlins, lighting gremlins – this movie has it all!

Rick and Patrick are joined by writer/film critic Mariko McDonald to parse out the plethora of in-jokes, references to classic horror, odd Easter eggs, fourth wall-breaking, and overall zaniness, while also discussing a bit of the film’s history and how it compares to Gremlins. One could talk for hours about this masterful example of studio-funded anarchy, so for all this and more, have a listen!

Sordid Cinema Podcast #550: Is ‘Dog Soldiers’ a Bitch of a Werewolf Movie?

Sordid Cinema Podcast #550: Is ‘Dog Soldiers’ a Bitch of a Werewolf Movie?

June 10, 2020

This week on the Sordid Cinema Podcast we discuss Neil Marshall’s first feature— the low-budget werewolf action/adventure siege film titled, Dog Soldiers. Frightening, funny, and packed with action, Dog Soldiers is considered one of the five best werewolf movies ever made and was an incredible showcase of Marshall’s (then) burgeoning talent.

It certainly made a name for the director who has since gone onto a highly promising career as a genre director, but is it as good as they say it is?

This week, Tim Maison joins us to help answer several questions we have about the movie including the unexpected plot twist and whether this movie could have used a better script. All this and more!

Sordid Cinema Podcast #549: ‘The Vast of Night’ is a Fantastic Sci-Fi Directorial Debut

Sordid Cinema Podcast #549: ‘The Vast of Night’ is a Fantastic Sci-Fi Directorial Debut

June 2, 2020

This week we take a break from reviving older classics to take a look at a recently released indie sci-fi gem called The Vast of Night. The film (now available on Amazon Prime) depicts a fateful evening in a small town in 1950s New Mexico as they host a rival high school basketball team for the big game, but also may be getting some visitors from even further out of town. It’s up to a young switchboard operator and a radio DJ to uncover the truth. Rick and Patrick are once again joined by critic Stephen Silver to discuss the many things that director Andrew Patterson does right in his feature debut, from virtuoso camerawork to the fantastic rhythm he develops using editing. We also praise the engaging performances of the film’s two leads, who anchor the entire production.

The Vast of Night promises sci-fi creeps along the lines of The Twilight Zone, but does it deliver on this? Do all the stylistic approaches work in supporting the story and tone? And just why is that basketball game so important?

For all this and more, have a listen to our breakdown of this wonderful little film!

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #548: ‘The Mist’ Contains Monster Movie Greatness

Sordid Cinema Podcast #548: ‘The Mist’ Contains Monster Movie Greatness

May 26, 2020

Frank Darabont’s The Mist Podcast Review

Though its ending may leave some viewers in a daze, Frank Darabont’s 2007 adaptation of Stephen King’s novella, The Mist, is clearly old-fashioned monster moviemaking at its best. This week, Rick and Patrick are joined by artist Dan Bransfield to talk about what makes this simple story of a group of small-towners stuck in a grocery store during the onset of a foggy inter-dimensional invasion such a delightful throwback to B-movie horror.

With a cast of characters (many of whom played by Darabont regulars) that efficiently portray the ugly breakdown of community during a crisis, and a host of mysterious creatures representing the external threat that acts as the catalyst, The Mist is filled with tense moments and fascinating threads (even if some of them seem to go nowhere). Of course, that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few things we might change if we had the chance (child actors or executions of twist endings), but there’s more than enough to love here to recommend for genre fans. What are our favorite scenes? Who is the film’s MVP? Will The Mist stand the test of time?

For a little debate on these questions and more, have a listen!

Sordid Cinema Podcast #547: ‘The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover’

Sordid Cinema Podcast #547: ‘The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover’

May 1, 2020

This week on the Sordid Cinema podcast, we discuss The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, Peter Greenaway’s most successful film and some would argue his true masterpiece— although not to the taste of the average cinema goer.

 

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #530: Stephen King’s ‘It’

Sordid Cinema Podcast #530: Stephen King’s ‘It’

September 19, 2017

There just aren’t enough movies about crazy killer clowns these days, so it’s with open arms that we welcome Pennywise back onto the screen. He’s grown up a bit, as this latest adaptation of Stephen King’s IT is the first to release theatrically, but not a step has been lost in the process when it comes to terrorizing dorky kids. This week Simon, Rick, and Patrick immerse themselves in a frightening world of town curses, freaky paintings, New Kids on the Block, and tighty whities. How does the new version of IT compare to the 1990 miniseries? Who’s the coolest Loser in the Loser’s Club? Is that one scene from the book really unfilmable? And most importantly, will IT make audiences remember what it’s like to be afraid of slide projectors?

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