Sordid Cinema Podcast

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Sordid Cinema Podcast Rewind: Why Mulholland Drive is a Masterpiece

October 19th, 2021

David Lynch Special Part 1: Mulholland Drive Review

In what turned out to be one of the most epic conversations in our podcast’s history, Ricky, Simon, and Edgar Chaput were joined by David Lynch superfan and friend of the show Kate Rennebohm for a two-part dissection of David Lynch’s films: 2001’s Mulholland Drive and 2006’s Inland Empire. Discussed: rabbits, the Lincoln assassination, the significance of doorknobs, yelling at Laura Dern, and many, many more odd tangents. Here is the first half of the special. Enjoy!

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Midnight Mass: What Makes Mike Flanagan’s Netflix Series Great

October 18th, 2021

Midnight Mass Review

This week on the Sordid Cinema Podcast, we discuss Mike Flanagan’s Midnight Mass, the Netflix series which some critics are calling one of the best shows of 2021.

The seven-episode creature feature smartly weaves together vampire tropes with biblical texts, blending horror with profound questions about spirituality, religion, and faith— and like Mike Flanagan’s best work, the show prioritizes characters and emotions over cheap scares and shock value. As long as expectations are in check, the series’ provides few scares. In fact, it’s the type of show that will sooner make you cry than have you jump out of your seat— but we love it no less! Sit back, relax, and listen to us discuss in great detail this small screen gem! Joining us this week is TV critic, Randy Dankievitch.

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #594: Nosferatu the Vampyre

September 29th, 2021

Nosferatu the Vampyre Review

This week, we take a look back at Nosferatu – no, not that one! Werner Herzog’s 1979 stab at the Dracula mythos, Nosferatu the Vampyre, complete with the great and terrible Klaus Kinski as the titular ghoul, is the one we’re taking a look at this time, inspired by recent news that Robert Eggers will be making a run at the same material for his next feature. Discussed: mass rat murder, the weirdnesses of the German/English dual release, and the eternal appeal of this character.

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #594: Don’t Snooze On The Big Sleep

September 9th, 2021

The Big Sleep (1946) Podcast Review

Sex, drugs, gambling, pornography, murder — not the topics one normally thinks of when picturing a Humphrey Bogart movie, but they’re just the tip of the iceberg of dirty dealings in Howard Hawks’ adaptation of Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep. Sure, detective Philip Marlowe finds plenty of down time to chat up with every coquette and femme fatale that crosses his path, but that’s only in between uncovering blackmail rackets, staring down the barrels of multiple guns, getting worked over by burly goons, and trading bullets with slimy assassins.

This week, the Sordid Cinema Podcast sinks into the seedy underworld and tries to understand exactly what the hell is going on with all the duplicity and backstabbing. Who is after what now, and why? Or maybe we’ll just give up and drink in the juicy banter between Bogey and Bacall. Regardless, there’s plenty to appreciate in The Big Sleep, including some artful dodging of Hays code-era restrictions. But does this Howard Hawks movie pass the Howard Hawks test? For all this and more, have a listen!

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #593: The Suicide Squad— An Exuberant, Bloody, And Hilariously Superhero Romp

September 6th, 2021

The Suicide Squad Podcast Review

This week on the Sordid Cinema Podcast, we discuss James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad, a movie that’s not only edgy, sharp, and funny but directed with so much style and verve, it’s one of the most entertaining comic book movies ever made. With The Suicide Squad, Gunn shows that there are ways to keep things edgy while offering enough humor and action to reach a wide audience and unlike most blockbusters, everyone here is a huge fan including Patrick Murphy, who usually dislikes superhero films. In fact, we are such big fans, we all watched the movie twice this week and we’re to tell you who our favourite characters are and explain why The Suicide Squad stands on its own in a way superhero movies often don’t. All this and more!

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #592: To Live And Die In L.A. — The Quintessential L.A. Crime Film

August 18th, 2021

To Live and Die in L.A. Review

We continue our informal, intermittent series on grimy cops vs crooks genre movies (see also: Drug WarKing of New YorkHard Boiled) with William Friedkin’s slick-but-gritty 1985 thriller To Live and Die in L.A. With its amoral characters, full-frontal nudity, and wildly epic car chase, this is one we (mostly) find lots to rave about. 

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #591: M. Night Shyamalan’s Old

August 10th, 2021

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that Old, the latest thriller from the endlessly inventive — if not always successful — director M. Night Shyamalan, has critics divided. Some argue the film features an intriguing concept, but its execution is extremely flawed. Others call it an entertaining thought exercise from one of Hollywood’s most invigorating filmmakers that is never, not fun. Love him or hate him, as cinephiles, we can at least admire how Shyamalan has adjusted to the ebb and flow of his career by self-financing when the money isn’t there. Old is in every respect, an M. Night film— written, directed, funded, and produced by the man himself— and that folks, is enough reason to spend 60 minutes discussing the movie, even if some of us absolutely hate it.

Sordid Cinema Podcast #590: Anthony Perkins Gets Away With Murder Psycho III

August 5th, 2021

Psycho III Review

Reviving Norman Bates for the decade of slasher movies was a no-brainer, but Psycho II dove too deep into irrelevant lore and forgot about the fun. Thankfully, director and star Anthony Perkins righted the wrongs of Norman’s past with the wickedly entertaining Psycho III, an overlooked gem lost in a sea of sequel apathy. Artful filmmaking, economical storytelling, a talented cast, and a wonderful lead performance don’t care that movies with the number three in the title aren’t supposed to be good. Psycho III might not live up to the legendary reputation of Hitchcock’s masterpiece, but it’s a genuinely fascinating look at an iconic character from the man who knew him best. It’s also a solid slasher flick with a dark sense of humor .

This week, Rick, Simon, and Patrick don’t make the same mistake 80s audiences did — we spend a night at the Bates Motel, soaking in all the weirdness. Topics up for discussion include brilliant callbacks, creative transitions, the burden of predecessors, bloody ice cubes, and very well-placed lamps. Sure, there’s one scene most of us would change (exposition dump), but so much more we’d keep preserved like a stuffed bird. For all this and more, have a listen!

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #589: A Quiet Place: Part II Feels More Like A Video Game Sequel

July 30th, 2021

Quiet Place: Part II Review

New movie! Remember new movies? Those still come out on occasion. Simon decided it was time to treat the Sordid Cinema audience to something a little more contemporary than usual, so it’s time to dissect John Krasinski’s A Quiet Place: Part II, which swaps out Office Jim in favor of a very haunted Cillian Murphy. We take this as an opportunity to look at the Quiet Place Cinematic Universe and ponder its future as one of the few major movie series (soon to have its own spinoff!) to not be based on pre-existing intellectual property. Also discussed: the influence of video games, the blessing of short runtimes, and the enduring appeal of family stories set in apocalyptic hellscapes.

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Sordid Cinema Podcast #588: Sleepaway Camp Serves A Helping Of Summer Slaughter

July 27th, 2021

Sleepaway Camp Review

This week on the Sordid Cinema Podcast, Ricky D, Patrick Murphy, and Simon Howell travel back to 1983 and review Richard Hiltzik’s deeply gay-coded Sleepaway Camp. The crew discusses the many different interpretations of the film and breaks down the very famous theory citing two killers, not one. Meanwhile, Ricky explains why Ricky is one of his all-time favourite characters in a slasher film. Of course, we couldn’t review the seminal 80s classic without addressing the controversial, shocking, and some would say brilliant twist ending. All this and more!

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